DANIEL דניאל

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Original Bible FAQ

We discovered that the original Bible (Hebrew) was created by GOD, since it is encoded with messaging to humanity on 4 different levels. The original Bible has remained unaltered: 1,197,000 million Hebrew letters, 305,490 words, 23,206 verses, 929 chapters, in 39 books. Each of the 22 Hebrew letters is coded with two unique numbers between 1 and 510. As a result, each word or verse, is coded with meaning. The original Bible is the global source for 724 human-mistranslated books that lack the code, such as KJV.
Each of the 22 Biblical Hebrew letters is coded with two unique numbers between 1 to 510. Hence, each word in the original Bible is coded with a numerical value and a meaning. The patented code2GOD system comprises 32 mathematical methods that decode GOD’s messaging to humanity from the original Bible. It was invented by Don Karl Juravin. The findings provide answers to life’s most sought-after questions such as: “What is our purpose in life?”, “What is after death?” or, “How to maximize life?”

We have scientifically determined that words and verses in the original Bible are coded with social and scientific information that are more advanced than today’s science. As such, it can’t be a document created by a mere human in a cave. Therefore, the original Bible was created by a super-intelligent entity named in the original Bible as “GOD אלהים” and “YHWH יהוה” (known as Lord). Only the “GOD” entity can describe the genesis period with the encoded mathematical formulas.

Logically, believers who think that the original Bible was created by humans, assembled over time, are praying on a history book and guiding their lives based on an archeology book. Logically, if you believe that GOD created the universe, GOD can also make the Bible appear without the need for “inspiring human writers” to write it.

While the original Bible was created by GOD and is encoded with messaging to humanity on four different levels, any human translation becomes merely a “story of the Bible” written based on a human understanding and interpretation of the complex, coded original Hebrew Bible. Since only the Hebrew letters, words, and parables are embedded with the code, any translation will lose any divine messaging and become merely a story, as understood by a mere human.

Can a human interpretation, or mistranslated book, like KJV, be really holy? Is that the Word Of GOD or the word of another man?

GOD (Elohim אלהים coded 86) is not necessarily the same as Lord (YHWH יהוה coded 26). While GOD is a classification (like saying human, animal, or plant), YHWH is the name of the entity. The YHWH name is the combination of the words: past (היה), present (הווה), and future (יהיה).
We can scientifically determine, with the highest certainty, that YHWH is the creator of:

  • The 22 Hebrew letters
  • The Hebrew language, and
  • The original Bible

It is highly likely that YHWH brought into existence earth and life forms. It is likely that YHWH was brought the universe into existence. There is also a high probability that GOD is directly or indirectly, responsible for our daily lives, events, and what humans consider to be random, unknown, uncertain, or simply, luck.
We are researching the scientific difference between GOD and YHWH. For now, we assume the term “GOD,” which can be anything and everything, from a particle to the entire nature, or the universe.

Letters: 1,197,000; Words: 305,490; Verses: 23,206; Chapters: 929; Books: 39

code2CODE value: 78,091,262

Shortest verse: 9 letters in 1 Chronicles 1:1
אדם שת אנוש Adam, Sheth, Enosh,

Longest verse: 193 letters in Esther 8:9
ויקראו ספרי המלך בעת ההיא בחדש השלישי הוא חדש סיון בשלושה ועשרים בו ויכתב ככל אשר צוה מרדכי אל היהודים ואל האחשדרפנים והפחות ושרי המדינות אשר מהדו ועד כוש שבע ועשרים ומאה מדינה מדינה ומדינה ככתבה ועם ועם כלשנו ואל היהודים ככתבם וכלשונם
Then were the king’s scribes called at that time in the third month, that [is], the month Sivan, on the three and twentieth [day] thereof; and it was written according to all that Mordecai commanded unto the Jews, and to the lieutenants, and the deputies and rulers of the provinces which [are] from India unto Ethiopia, an hundred twenty and seven provinces, unto every province according to the writing thereof, and unto every people after their language, and to the Jews according to their writing, and according to their language.

The 305,490 Biblical letter distribution: 

א95,683 • ב65,215 • ג10,080 • ד32,370 • ה101,964 • ו129,592 • ז9,099 • ח27,598 • ט6,310 • י137,842 • כ47,469 • ל88,302 • מ98,929 • נ55,093 • ס7,635 • ע44,811 • פ18,284 • צ14,977 • ק16,278 • ר68,065 • ש58,198 • ת63,206

א7.99% • ב5.45% • ג0.84% • ד2.70% • ה8.52% • ו10.83% • ז0.76% • ח2.31% • ט0.53% • י11.52% • כ3.97% • ל7.38% • מ8.26% • נ4.60% • ס0.64% • ע3.74% • פ1.53% • צ1.25% • ק1.36% • ר5.69% • ש4.86% • ת5.28%

1 Genesis בראשית Bereshit • 2 Exodus שמות Shmot • 3 Leviticus ויקרא VaYekra • 4 Numbers במדבר BaMidbar • 5 Deuteronomy דברים Dvarim • 6 Joshua  יהושע Yehoshua• 7 Judges שופטים Shoftim • 8 Samuel 1 שמואל Shmuel • 9 Samuel 2 שמואל Shmuel • 10 Kings 1 מלכים Melachim • 11 Kings 2 מלכים Melachim • 12 Isaiah ישעיהו Ishahaiah • 13 Jeremiah ירמיהו Yermiyahu • 14 Ezekiel יחזקאל Yechezkel • 15 Hosea הושע Hoshe-ah • 16 Joel יואל Yoel • 17 Amos עמוס Amos • 18 Obadiah עובדיה Ovadiah • 19 Jonah יונה Yona • 20 Micah מיכה Michah • 21 Nahum נחום Nachum • 22 Habakkuk חבקוק Chavakuk • 23 Zephaniah צפניה Zephaniah • 24 Haggai חגי Haggai • 25 Zechariah זכריה Zechariah • 26 Malachi מלאכי Malachi • 27 Psalms תהלים Tehilim • 28 Proverbs משלי Mishlei • 29 Job איוב Eyov • 30 Song of Songs שיר השירים Shir a-shirim • 31 Ruth רות Rut • 32  Lamentations איכה Eicha •33 Ecclesiastes קהלת  Kahelet • 34 Esther אסתר Ester • 35 Daniel דניאל Daniel • 36 Ezra עזרא Ezra • 37 Nehemiah נחמיה Nehemiah • 38 Chronicles 1 דברי הימים Divrei HaYamim • 39 Chronicles 2 דברי הימים Divrei HaYamim

Daniel Book Explainer Video

This video explains Daniel on basic level 1 as a translated story (the 4 Bible understanding levels) with 80-90% accuracy (thanks to the BibleProject)
Play Video about Daniel explainer video thumbnail

Book of Daniel STATS

GOD’s messaging to humanity is mathematically encoded in each word and verse within the original Bible. Can you find God’s messaging in the 39 books’ stats?
  • Words: 5,919 (1.938% of Word Of God of total 305,490 words)
  • Letters: 24,291 (2.029% of Word Of God of total 1,197,000 letters)
  • Verses: 357 (1.538% of Word Of God of total 23,206 verses)
  • code2GOD value: 1,439,016 of 78,091,262 

Shortest verse: 20 letters in Daniel 4:28כלא מטא על נבוכדנצר מלכאAll this came upon the king Nebuchadnezzar.

Longest verse: 169 letters in Daniel 3:15כען הן איתיכון עתידין די בעדנא די תשמעון קל קרנא משרוקיתא קיתרס שבכא פסנתרין וסומפניה וכל זני זמרא תפלון ותסגדון לצלמא די עבדת והן לא תסגדון בה שעתה תתרמון לגוא אתון נורא יקדתא ומן הוא אלה די ישיזבנכון מן ידיNow if ye be ready that at what time ye hear the sound of the cornet, flute, harp, sackbut, psaltery, and dulcimer, and all kinds of musick, ye fall down and worship the image which I have made; [well]: but if ye worship not, ye shall be cast the same hour into the midst of a burning fiery furnace; and who [is] that God that shall deliver you out of my hands?

  • Start word: בשנת
  • Last word: הימין
  • Middle letter: In position 12146 is אDaniel 6:3
  • Middle word: In position 2960 is כלDaniel 6:3
The original Bible was created using the 22 Hebrew letters. See Bible FAQ.
  • א2098 ב1228 ג238 ד1174 ה1646 ו2375 ז235 ח560 ט143 י2733 כ986 ל2087 מ1784 נ1641 ס155 ע896 פ364 צ265 ק384 ר1271 ש927 ת1101
  • 2,733 י2,375 ו2,098 א2,087 ל1,784 מ1,646 ה1,641 נ1,271 ר1,228 ב1,174 ד1,101 ת986 כ927 ש896 ע560 ח384 ק364 פ265 צ238 ג235 ז155 ס143 ט
  • 11.25% י9.78% ו8.64% א8.59% ל7.34% מ6.78% ה6.76% נ5.23% ר5.06% ב4.83% ד4.53% ת4.06% כ3.82% ש3.69% ע2.31% ח1.58% ק1.50% פ1.09% צ0.98% ג0.97% ז0.64% ס0.59% ט

Daniel Book FAQ

Academic studies (Britannica) of the translated book of Daniel. Doesn’t replace the scientific discoveries of code2GOD.

The book of Daniel, also called “The Prophecy Of Daniel”, is a book of the Old Testament found in the Ketuvim (Writings), the third section of the Jewish canon, but placed among the Prophets in the Christian canon. The first half of the book (chapters 1–6) contains stories in the third person about the experiences of Daniel and his friends under Kings Nebuchadrezzar II, Belshazzar, Darius I, and Cyrus II; the second half is written mostly in the first person, contains reports of Daniel’s three visions (and one dream). The second half of the book names the narrator, a certain Daniel who, according to chapter 1, was exiled to Babylon.

Daniel a nobleman like Ezekiel, had been taken as a young man captive in Babylon by Nebuchadnezzar. Daniel’s superior way of life earns him great respect in the Babylonian government. This book presents the best-known predictions of the restoration of Israel, the history of the nations, and the end of the age.

The book can be broken down into three parts. Chapter 1 describes the destruction of Jerusalem, captivity, and exile. Chapter 2-7 gives a record of Nebuchadnezzar’s and Belshazzar’s dreams and their interpretation by Daniel. Chapters 8-12 contain a vision of future kingdoms and their rulers, Seventy weeks of prophecy, and a precise timeline of when the Messiah would come. It comforts us that our hope in salvation is sure, but that our faith must endure a while longer.

Daniel is the main character of the book of Daniel. According to the Hebrew Bible, Daniel was a noble Jewish youth of Jerusalem taken into captivity by Nebuchadnezzar II of Babylon, serving the king and his successors with loyalty and ability until the time of the Persian conqueror Cyrus, all the while remaining true to the God of Israel.

The book of Daniel begins with an introduction telling how Daniel and his companions came to be in Babylon, followed by a set of tales set in the Babylonian and Persian courts, followed in turn by a set of visions in which Daniel sees the remote future of the world and of Israel.

In the third year of the reign of Jehoiakim, Daniel and his friends Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah are taken to Babylon by Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon. The four are chosen for their intellect and beauty to be trained in the Babylonian court and are given new names. Daniel is given the Babylonian name Belteshazzar, while his companions are given the Babylonian names Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego.

Daniel and his friends refuse the food and wine provided by the king of Babylon to avoid becoming defiled. They receive wisdom from God and surpass “all the magicians and enchanters of the kingdom.”

Nebuchadnezzar dreams of a giant statue made of four metals with feet of mingled iron and clay, smashed by a stone from heaven. Only Daniel is able to interpret it: the dream signifies four kingdoms, of which Babylon is the first, but God will destroy them.

The fiery furnace (chapter 3): Daniel’s companions Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego refuse to bow to King Nebuchadnezzar’s golden statue and are thrown into a fiery furnace. Nebuchadnezzar is astonished to see a fourth figure in the furnace with the three, one “with the appearance like a son of the gods.” So the king calls the three to come out of the fire, blesses the God of Israel, and decrees that any who blaspheme against him shall be torn limb from limb.

Nebuchadnezzar’s madness (chapter 4): Nebuchadnezzar recounts a dream of a huge tree that is suddenly cut down at the command of a heavenly messenger. Daniel is summoned and interprets the dream.

The tree is Nebuchadnezzar himself, who for seven years will lose his mind and live like a wild beast. All of this comes to pass until, at the end of the specified time, Nebuchadnezzar acknowledges that “heaven rules” and his kingdom and sanity are restored.

Belshazzar’s feast (chapter 5): Belshazzar and his nobles blasphemously drink from sacred Jewish temple vessels, offering praise to inanimate gods, until a hand mysteriously appears and writes upon the wall.

The horrified king summons Daniel, who upbraids him for his lack of humility before God, and interprets the message: Belshazzar’s kingdom will be given to the Medes and Persians. Belshazzar rewards Daniel and raises him to be third in the kingdom, and that very night Belshazzar is slain and Darius the Mede takes the kingdom.

Belshazzar was a coregent of Babylon who was killed at the capture of the city by the Persians. Belshazzar had been known only from the biblical book of Daniel (chapters 5, 7–8) and from Xenophon’s Cyropaedia.

Though he is referred to in the book of Daniel as the son of Nebuchadrezzar, the Babylonian inscriptions indicate that he was in fact the eldest son of Nabonidus, who was king of Babylon and of Nitocris, who was perhaps a daughter of Nebuchadrezzar. When Nabonidus went into exile, he entrusted Belshazzar with the throne and the major part of his army.

During his coregency, Belshazzar administered the government, his own estates, and those of his father, though, according to the book of Daniel, famine and economic setbacks occurred late in his rule. According to the accounts in the Bible and Xenophon, Belshazzar held a last great feast at which he saw a hand writing on a wall.

The prophet Daniel, interpreting the handwriting on the wall as God’s judgment on the king, foretold the imminent destruction of the city. Belshazzar died after Babylon fell to the Persian general Gobyras without resistance and probably before the Persian king Cyrus II entered the city.

Daniel 1:19-20 – “The king talked with them, and he found none equal to Daniel, Hananiah, Mishael and Azariah; so they entered the king’s service. In every matter of wisdom and understanding about which the king questioned them, he found them ten times better than all the magicians and enchanters in his whole kingdom.”

Daniel 2:31 – “You looked, O king, and there before you stood a large statue – an enormous, dazzling statue, awesome in appearance.”

Daniel 3:17-18 – “If we are thrown into the blazing furnace, the God we serve is able to save us from it, and he will rescue us from your hand, O king. But even if he does not, we want you to know, O king, that we will not serve your gods or worship the image of gold you have set up.”

Daniel 4:34-35 – “His dominion is an eternal dominion; his kingdom endures from generation to generation. All the peoples of the earth are regarded as nothing. He does as he pleases with the powers of heaven and the peoples of the earth. No one can hold back his hand or say to him: ‘What have you done?’”

Daniel 9:24 – “Seventy ‘sevens’ are decreed for your people and your holy city to finish transgression, to put an end to sin, to atone for wickedness, to bring in everlasting righteousness, to seal up vision and prophecy and to anoint the Most Holy Place.”

Darius elevates Daniel to high office, exciting the jealousy of other officials. Knowing of Daniel’s devotion to his God, his enemies trick the king into issuing an edict forbidding worship of any other god or man for a 30-day period. Daniel continues to pray three times a day to God towards Jerusalem; he is accused and King Darius, forced by his own decree, throws Daniel into the lions’ den.

But God shuts up the mouths of the lions, and the next morning Darius rejoices to find him unharmed. The king casts Daniel’s accusers into the lions’ pit together with their wives and children to be instantly devoured, while he himself acknowledges Daniel’s God as he whose kingdom shall never be destroyed.

“Multitudes who sleep in the dust of the earth will awake, some to everlasting life, others to shame and everlasting contempt; those who are wise will shine like the brightness of the heavens, and those who lead many to righteousness, like the stars for ever and ever.”

Darius I, by name Darius the Great, was a king of Persia, one of the greatest rulers of the Achaemenid dynasty, who was noted for his administrative genius and for his great building projects. Darius attempted several times to conquer Greece; his fleet was destroyed by a storm, and the Athenians defeated his army at Marathon.

Although Darius consolidated and added to the conquests of his predecessors, it was as an administrator that he made his greatest contribution to Persian history. He completed the organization of the empire into satrapies, initiated by Cyrus the Great, and fixed the annual tribute due from each province. During his reign, ambitious and far-sighted projects were undertaken to promote imperial trade and commerce.

Coinage, weights, and measures were standardized and land and sea routes developed. An expedition led by Scylax of Caryanda sailed down the Indus River and explored the sea route from its mouth to Egypt, and a canal from the Nile River to the Red Sea, probably begun by the chief of the Egyptian delta lords, Necho I, was repaired and completed.

While measures were thus taken to unite the diverse peoples of the empire by a uniform administration, Darius followed the example of Cyrus in respecting native religious institutions. In Egypt, he assumed an Egyptian titulary and gave active support to the cult. He built a temple to the god Amon in the Kharga oasis, endowed the temple at Edfu, and carried out restoration work in other sanctuaries.

In the second year of his reign, Nebuchadnezzar has a dream. When he wakes up, he realizes that the dream has some important message, so he consults his wise men. Wary of their potential to fabricate an explanation, the king refuses to tell the wise men what he saw in his dream.

Rather, he demands that his wise men tell him what the content of the dream was, and then interpret it. When the wise men protest that this is beyond the power of any man, he sentences all, including Daniel and his friends, to death.

Daniel receives an explanatory vision from God: Nebuchadnezzar had seen an enormous statue with a head of gold, breast, and arms of silver, belly, and thighs of bronze, legs of iron, and feet of mixed iron and clay, then saw the statue destroyed by a rock that turned into a mountain filling the whole earth.

Daniel explains the dream to the king: the statue symbolized four successive kingdoms, starting with Nebuchadnezzar, all of which would be crushed by God’s kingdom, which would endure forever. Nebuchadnezzar acknowledges the supremacy of Daniel’s god, raises Daniel over all his wise men, and places Daniel and his companions in the province of Babylon.

In the third year of King Jehoiakim, God allows Jerusalem to fall into the power of Nebuchadnezzar II, king of Babylon. Young Israelites of the noble and royal family, “without physical defect, and handsome,” versed in wisdom and competent to serve in the palace of the king, are taken to Babylon to be taught the literature and language of that nation.

Among them are Daniel and his three companions, who refuse to touch the royal food and wine. Their overseer fears for his life in case the health of his charges deteriorates, but Daniel suggests a trial and the four emerge healthier than their counterparts from ten days of consuming nothing but vegetables and water.

They are allowed to continue to refrain from eating the king’s food, and to Daniel, God gives insight into visions and dreams. When their training is done Nebuchadnezzar finds them ‘ten times better’ than all the wise men in his service and therefore keeps them at his court, where Daniel continues until the first year of King Cyrus.

Vision of the beasts from the sea (chapter 7): In the first year of Belshazzar Daniel has a dream of four monstrous beasts arising from the sea. The fourth, a beast with ten horns, devours the whole earth, treading it down and crushing it, and a further small horn appears and uproots three of the earlier horns.

The Ancient of Days judges and destroys the beast, and “one like a son of man” is given everlasting kingship over the entire world. One of Daniel’s attendants explains that the four beasts represent four kings, but that “the holy ones of the Most High” would receive the everlasting kingdom.

The fourth beast would be the fourth kingdom with ten kings, and another king who would pull down three kings and make war on the “holy ones” for “a time, two times and a half,” after which the heavenly judgment will be made against him and the “holy ones” will receive the everlasting kingdom.

Vision of the ram and goat (chapter 8): In the third year of Belshazzar Daniel had a vision of a ram and goat. The ram has two mighty horns, one longer than the other, and it charges west, north, and south, overpowering all other beasts. A goat with a single horn appears from the west and destroys the ram.

The goat becomes very powerful until the horn breaks off and is replaced by four lesser horns. A small horn that grows very large, it stops the daily temple sacrifices and desecrates the sanctuary for two thousand three hundred “evenings and mornings” (which could be either 1,150 or 2,300 days) until the temple is cleansed. The angel Gabriel informs him that the ram represents the Medes and Persians, the goat is Greece, and the “little horn” is a wicked king.

Vision of the Seventy Weeks (chapter 9): In the first year of Darius the Mede, Daniel meditates on the word of Jeremiah that the desolation of Jerusalem would last seventy years; he confesses the sin of Israel and pleads for God to restore Israel and the “desolated sanctuary” of the Temple.

The angel Gabriel explains that the seventy years stand for seventy “weeks” of years (490 years), during which the Temple will first be restored, then later defiled by a “prince who is to come,” “until the decreed end is poured out.”

Daniel 10: In the third year of Cyrus Daniel sees in his vision an angel (called “a man”, but clearly a supernatural being) who explains that he is in the midst of a war with the “prince of Persia”, assisted only by Michael, “your prince.” The “prince of Greece” will shortly come, but first, he will reveal what will happen to Daniel’s people.

Daniel 11: A future king of Persia will make war on the king of Greece, a “mighty king” will arise and wield power until his empire is broken up and given to others, and finally, the king of the south (identified in verse 8 as Egypt) will go to war with the “king of the north.” After many battles (described in great detail) a “contemptible person” will become king of the north; this king will invade the south two times, the first time with success, but on his second he will be stopped by “ships of Kittim.”

He will turn back to his own country, and on the way, his soldiers will desecrate the Temple, abolish the daily sacrifice, and set up the abomination of desolation. He will defeat and subjugate Libya and Egypt, but “reports from the east and north will alarm him,” and he will meet his end “between the sea and the holy mountain.”

Daniel 12: At this time Michael will come. It will be a time of great distress, but all those whose names are written will be delivered.

Daniel

Original Bible Vs. 14 Human Translations