THE BIBLICAL HEBREW LETTERS

more code2GOD
GOD coded each of the 22 Hebrew letters with two unique numbers from 1 to 510 for humans to discover his messaging to humanity. This page is without a scientific base.
©code2GOD All Right Reserved
code2GOD table

Alef א 1

The Hebrew letter א, Aleph, has a rich history in biblical and religious texts. In the Hebrew language, it is the first letter of the alphabet and is code2GOD value of 1. There are several reasons why GOD may have created the letter א in this way, and these reasons can be explored through examining its significance in Hebrew and biblical texts.

One possible reason for the creation of the letter א is its symbolism in Hebrew. The letter א is made up of two Yods, one facing up and one facing down, with a diagonal Vav connecting them. In Jewish mysticism, the upward facing Yod represents the divine, while the downward facing Yod represents the earthly. The Vav represents the connection between the two, as it connects the heavens and the earth. This symbolism is present in many Hebrew words that begin with the letter א, such as אֱלֹהִים (Elohim), meaning GOD, and אֶרֶץ (Eretz), meaning earth.

Another reason for the significance of the letter א is its use in the name of God. In the original Hebrew Bible, the name of GOD is written as יהוה, or YHWH, which is commonly referred to as the Tetragrammaton. The first letter of this name is the letter א, and it is believed to represent God’s primacy and sovereignty. The use of the letter א in the name of God also highlights its importance and power in Hebrew culture and religion.

Additionally, the letter א is used in many important Hebrew words that are central to Jewish theology and belief. For example, the word אֱמֶת (emet), meaning truth, is composed of the letters א, מ, and ת, which are the first, middle, and last letters of the Hebrew alphabet. This symbolizes the completeness and universality of truth, as it encompasses all aspects of knowledge and understanding.

The letter א is also used in many other important Hebrew words, such as אָב (av), meaning father, אִמָּה (imah), meaning mother, and אָח (ach), meaning brother. These words are significant in Jewish culture and religion, as they represent the foundational relationships that exist within families and communities.

Beit/Bet/Bait ב 2

The Hebrew letter ב, known as Bet or Bait or Beit, is the second letter of the Hebrew alphabet and is assigned the code2GOD value of 2. Its history and significance can be explored through examining its use in Hebrew and biblical texts, as well as the reasons why GOD may have created it in this way.

One possible reason for the creation of the letter ב is its shape, which resembles a house. In Hebrew, the word בַּיִת (bayit) means “house,” and the letter ב is often used in words related to homes and dwellings. This connection between the letter ב and the concept of a house may reflect GOD’s desire for his people to have a sense of stability and security in their lives, as a home provides a place of safety and comfort.

Additionally, the letter ב is used in many important Hebrew words related to relationships and community. For example, the word בַּר (bar), meaning “son,” is used in phrases like בֶּן-אָדָם (ben adam), meaning “son of man.” This phrase highlights the importance of humanity as a whole and emphasizes the idea of community and interconnectedness. Similarly, the word בַּת (bat), meaning “daughter,” is used in phrases like בַּת-צִיּוֹן (bat tziyon), meaning “daughter of Zion.” This phrase emphasizes the importance of the Jewish people as a community and highlights the concept of collective identity.

The letter ב is also used in many important Hebrew words related to GOD and spirituality. For example, the word בְּרֵאשִׁית (bereshit), meaning “in the beginning,” is used to describe the opening words of the book of Genesis. This word highlights the idea of creation and the beginning of the world, and emphasizes the role of GOD as the creator of all things.

Additionally, the letter ב is used in the word בִּינָה (binah), meaning “understanding” or “insight.” This word emphasizes the importance of knowledge and wisdom in Jewish culture and religion and highlights the role of GOD as the source of all knowledge and understanding.

Gimel ג 3

The Hebrew letter ג, known as Gimel, is the third letter of the Hebrew alphabet and is assigned the code2GOD value of 3. Its biblical history and significance can be explored through examining its use in Hebrew and biblical texts, as well as the reasons why GOD may have created it in this way.

One possible reason for the creation of the letter ג is its shape, which resembles a camel. In Hebrew, the word גָּמָל (gamal) means “camel,” and the letter ג is often used in words related to animals and nature. This connection between the letter ג and the natural world may reflect GOD’s desire for his people to have an appreciation and respect for the environment.

Additionally, the letter ג is used in many important Hebrew words related to the concept of giving and receiving. For example, the word גְּבוּל (gevul), meaning “boundary” or “border,” is used to describe the limits of a certain area or territory. This word emphasizes the importance of setting and respecting boundaries, both in interpersonal relationships and in society as a whole.

The word גֶּבֶר (gever), meaning “man” or “hero,” is used to describe a person who is strong, brave, and respected. This word highlights the importance of individual strength and courage, and emphasizes the role of GOD in empowering his people to overcome obstacles and challenges.

The letter ג is also used in many important Hebrew words related to GOD and spirituality. For example, the word גַּן (gan), meaning “garden,” is used to describe the Garden of Eden, where Adam and Eve lived before they were expelled. This word highlights the importance of nature and the role of God as the creator of all things.

Additionally, the word גָּאוֹן (ga’on), meaning “arrogance” or “pride,” is used to describe a negative trait that is opposed to humility and respect for others. This word emphasizes the importance of modesty and humility in Jewish culture and religion, and highlights the role of GOD as the ultimate authority and source of wisdom.

Dalet ד 4

The Hebrew letter ד, known as Dalet, is the fourth letter of the Hebrew alphabet and is assigned the code2GOD value of 4. Its biblical history and significance can be explored through examining its use in Hebrew and biblical texts, as well as the reasons why God may have created it in this way.

One possible reason for the creation of the letter ד is its shape, which resembles a doorway. In Hebrew, the word דֶּלֶת (delet) means “door,” and the letter ד is often used in words related to entry, exit, and transitions. This connection between the letter ד and the concept of a doorway may reflect GOD’s desire for his people to approach him with reverence and to see their relationship with him as a journey or process of growth and transformation.

Additionally, the letter ד is used in many important Hebrew words related to knowledge and understanding. For example, the word דַּעַת (da’at), meaning “knowledge” or “understanding,” is used to describe the ability to comprehend and interpret information. This word highlights the importance of education and intellectual curiosity, and emphasizes the role of God as the ultimate source of wisdom and knowledge.

The word דֶּרֶךְ (derekh), meaning “way” or “path,” is used to describe a route or journey. This word emphasizes the importance of having a sense of direction and purpose in life, and highlights the role of God as a guide and source of inspiration on this journey.

The letter ד is also used in many important Hebrew words related to God and spirituality. For example, the word דָּוִד (David), the name of the biblical king and ancestor of Jesus, emphasizes the role of God in choosing and guiding his people, and highlights the importance of faith and trust in GOD’s plan.

Additionally, the word דִּין (din), meaning “judgment” or “justice,” is used to describe the concept of righteousness and moral responsibility. This word emphasizes the importance of ethical behavior and social justice, and highlights the role of GOD as the ultimate arbiter of right and wrong.

Hei/HEH ה 5

To be completed

Vav ו 6

The Hebrew letter ו, also known as Vav, is the sixth letter of the Hebrew alphabet and is assigned the code2GOD” value of 6. Its biblical history and significance can be explored through examining its use in Hebrew and biblical texts, as well as the reasons why GOD may have created it in this way.

One possible reason for the creation of the letter ו is its shape, which resembles a hook or a nail. In Hebrew, the word וָו (vav) means “hook” or “peg,” and the letter ו is often used to connect words and phrases together. This connection between the letter ו and the concept of connection and linkage may reflect God’s desire for his people to be united and connected with one another and with him.

Additionally, the letter ו is used in many important Hebrew words related to redemption and salvation. For example, the word וְשִׁעֲרֵי צֶדֶק (vesh’arei tzedek), meaning “gates of righteousness,” is used in Psalm 118:20 to describe the gates through which the righteous enter into the presence of GOD. This word highlights the importance of righteousness and obedience to GOD’s commandments, and emphasizes the role of God as the source of salvation and redemption for his people.

The letter ו is also used in many important Hebrew words related to divine promises and covenants. For example, the word וַיְהִי (vayehi), meaning “and it came to pass,” is used throughout the Bible to indicate the fulfillment of GOD’s promises to his people. This word emphasizes the importance of trust and faith in GOD’s promises, and highlights the role of GOD as a faithful and trustworthy covenant-keeper.

Zain/Zayin ז 7

The Hebrew letter ז, known as Zayin, is the seventh letter of the Hebrew alphabet and is assigned the code2GOD” value of 7.  Zain means “penis” in Hebrew, and the shape of the letter, when reversed upside down, looks like a penis with testicles. It’s also the root word for “to be armed” or “equipped.” Its biblical history and significance can be explored through examining its use in Hebrew and biblical texts, as well as the reasons why GOD may have created it in this way.

One possible reason for the creation of the letter ז is its shape, which resembles a sword or a weapon. In Hebrew, the word זֵד (zed) means “arrogant” or “presumptuous,” and the letter ז is used in many words related to violence and warfare. This connection between the letter ז and the concept of violence and conflict may reflect God’s desire for his people to be strong and courageous in the face of adversity.

Additionally, the letter ז is used in many important Hebrew words related to divine blessings and provisions. For example, the word זָכַר (zakar), meaning “to remember,” is used throughout the Bible to describe GOD’s remembrance of his covenant with his people. This word emphasizes the importance of faithfulness and obedience to GOD’s commandments and highlights the role of God as a provider and sustainer of his people.

The letter ז is also used in many important Hebrew words related to spiritual growth and development. For example, the word זִיו (ziyv), meaning “splendor” or “radiance,” is used in Psalm 50:2 to describe the glory and majesty of GOD. This word emphasizes the importance of pursuing a deeper relationship with GOD and experiencing his presence and power in our lives.

Cheit/Chet ח 8

he Hebrew letter ח, known as Chet/Cheit, is the eighth letter of the Hebrew alphabet and is assigned the code2GOD value of 8. Its biblical history and significance can be explored through examining its use in Hebrew and biblical texts, as well as the reasons why God may have created it in this way.

One possible reason for the creation of the letter ח is its shape, which resembles a fence or an enclosure. In Hebrew, the word חֵטְא (chet), means “sin,” and is used throughout the Bible to describe disobedience to God’s commands. This connection between the letter ח and the concept of sin may reflect GOD’s desire for his people to be protected from sin and its consequences.

Additionally, the letter ח is used in many important Hebrew words related to life and vitality. For example, the word חַיִּים (chayim), meaning “life,” is used throughout the Bible to describe the importance of living in accordance with God’s will. This word emphasizes the role of God as the source of life and highlights the importance of following his commandments in order to experience fullness of life.

The letter ח is also used in many important Hebrew words related to grace and forgiveness. For example, the word חֶסֶד (chesed), meaning “lovingkindness” or “mercy,” is used throughout the Bible to describe GOD’s compassion and forgiveness towards his people. This word emphasizes the importance of extending grace and forgiveness to others, as well as receiving it from GOD.

Tet ט 9

The Hebrew letter ט, known as Tet, is the ninth letter of the Hebrew alphabet and is assigned the code2GOD value of 9. Its biblical history and significance can be explored through examining its use in Hebrew and biblical texts, as well as the reasons why GOD may have created it in this way.

One possible reason for the creation of the letter ט is its shape, which resembles a serpent or a snake. In Hebrew, the word נָחָשׁ (nachash), which means “serpent,” is used in the Bible to describe the serpent in the Garden of Eden who tempted Adam and Eve to eat the forbidden fruit. This connection between the letter ט and the concept of the serpent may reflect GOD’s desire for his people to be wary of temptation and sin, and to seek his guidance and protection.

Additionally, the letter ט is used in many important Hebrew words related to good and evil. For example, the word טוֹב (tov), meaning “good,” is used throughout the Bible to describe God’s nature and the things he has created. This word emphasizes the importance of seeking what is good and right, and following GOD’s will in all things. In contrast, the word רַע (ra), meaning “bad,” is used to describe that which is contrary to GOD’s will and character.

The letter ט is also used in the word תּוֹרָה (Torah), which is the Hebrew name for the first five books of the Bible, and represents the foundation of Jewish faith and practice. The word תּוֹרָה is derived from the Hebrew root word ירה (yarah), which means “to teach” or “to instruct.” This underscores the importance of learning and following GOD’s laws and commandments as a way of honoring and obeying him.

Yod י 10

The Hebrew letter י, also known as Yod, is the tenth letter of the Hebrew alphabet and is assigned the code2GOD value of 10. Its biblical history and significance can be explored through examining its use in Hebrew and biblical texts, as well as the reasons why GOD may have created it in this way.

The letter י is the smallest letter in the Hebrew alphabet and is often used to represent the concept of “one” or “unity.” This reflects GOD’s desire for his people to recognize the importance of unity and oneness, both with him and with each other.

The letter י is also used in many important Hebrew words related to GOD and his attributes. For example, the word יְהוָה (Yahweh), which is the name of GOD in the Old Testament, is spelled with the letters יהוה, highlighting the importance of this letter in expressing the nature and character of GOD.

In addition, the letter י is used in the word אֱלֹהִים (Elohim), which is another name for GOD in the Hebrew Bible. This word is plural in form, emphasizing the complex nature of GOD and his diverse attributes.

The letter י is also used in many important Hebrew words related to salvation and redemption. For example, the word יְשׁוּעָה (yeshu’ah), which means “salvation,” is used throughout the Old Testament to describe GOD’s plan to save his people from sin and death. This word emphasizes the importance of trusting in GOD’s plan for salvation and redemption.

Finally, the letter י is used in many Hebrew words related to human identity and purpose. For example, the word יְהוּדִי (yehudi), which means “Jewish,” is derived from the Hebrew word יְהוּדָה (Yehudah), which was the name of one of the twelve sons of Jacob. This connection emphasizes the importance of Jewish identity and the role of the Jewish people in GOD’s plan for the world.

Chaf

To be completed

Lamed

To be completed

Mem

To be completed

Nun

To be completed

Samech

To be completed

Aain

To be completed

Pei

To be completed

Tzadi

To be completed

Kof

To be completed

Reish

To be completed

Shin

To be completed

Tav

To be completed